Publications

Wrap STA00015:
Back in 2002 a company called Stockbridge Technology Centre (STC), an old ADAS research station based in Selby North Yorks, won a contract from a London based company called Enviros; who in turn had won a contract from the Quango WRAP (Waste Recyling and Action Plan). All this contract winning was to write a report on the benefits of compost to end users: but they had a problem. None of the people who had actually won the contract could actually write the report: and then they found me! The full story is recounted in the story of phasm 02 and summarised here:

It was not an easy relationship for a number of reasons; the most significant of which was that both my co-authors had little expertise or intention of writing anything and were relying on me. They were similarly planning on exploiting the Moral Right exemptions in British copyright law which would have robbed me of my rightful claim as author. Neither fact escaped my attention and so the document was constructed in a way that made it very difficult to make derivatives of and at the last minute I gave my employers a fait accompli: I finish the job as a self employed consultant or not at all. I gave ‘tax’ as my reasoning but the truth was it was the only way to prevent my moral right being stolen.

Despite having written 80% of the main body, the document when first published in 2004 omitted my name as author. It was only after a copyright lawyer assisted briefly that my name was added but it did not distinguish that I was the principal author nor attribute my specific contributions separately from the other authors as is correct. So whilst I managed to keep my Right to be associated with my work that association is sadly tangled up with the inferior work of others and further had to be fought for all the bloody way!so here it is phasm’s first and last national report

LitReviewCompostBen

Degree Essays of Note

The Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) from Early Migration to future conservation

evolution of herbicide resistance

Origin & Geographical Distribution of the Family Solanaceae


Cosmeston Community Farm Project:
A now defunct local organisation in South Wales, Cosmeston Community Farm had ambitions to turn an old quarry into an educational centre. The project was on an uphill struggle from the start and after a brief site visit it was clear to me that their dreams could and would never become a reality at the site they had chosen.

For the Quarry had been ‘reclaimed’; the hole had been filled in with waste. It was immediately obvious that as a land fill operation it had been poorly managed. Sink holes, strange liquids oozing along with the odd car bumper out the ground. The only use I could see for this site was to dummy run their idea and hopefully gain political support which in turn would increase their chances of finding a suitable site: but my words fell on deaf ears. Cosmeston Community Farm Project password = phasm [wpdm_file id=8]

Jersey worm farm: the final document
whilst only 20 pages long as one file this is over 25MB and more hassle than its worth to work out how to shrink it….

JWF 01 / JWF 02 / JWF 03 / JWF 04 / JWF 05 / JWF 06 / JWF 07 JWF 08 / JWF 09 / JWF 10 / JWF 11 / JWF 12 / JWF 13 / JWF 14 JWF 15 / JWF 16 / JWF 17 / JWF 18 / JWF 19 / JWF 20 / JWF 21

A WAY AHEAD FOR AGRICULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT, 2000 AND BEYOND

Although produced earlier and largely in a vain effort to win friends in the local Planning and Environment Department (who in reality should have been supporting me!) this interim document is a useful overview of what was happening at field 313.

COVER / page 01 / page 02 / page 03 / page 04 / page 05 / page 06 / page 07 / page 08 / page 09 / page 10

Finally there is Connectivity and Present Stories from a Future Past. The first is the account of the journey I went on for the year 2005. It was a mystical Spiritual journey and whilst important is not directly relevent here:

Present Stories from a future past are, as with Connectivity and a lot more to be found on my blog site, Conceptual Reflections (w43w.com)

Free Cultural Works (CC BY-NC-SA) Malcolm McEwen (2012)

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